2018 Taiwan Tour

3 - 4 November 2018
Taiwan

Sydney Dance Company returns to Taiwan in November to perform a dynamic double bill of Rafael Bonachela’s Lux Tenebris and Cheng Tsung-lung’s Full Moon.

Rafael Bonachela’s, Lux Tenebris explores light and darkness with fiercely physical movement and deep, electronic beats by composer Nick Wales.

Full Moon by Cheng Tsung-lung, the Artistic Director of Taiwan’s phenomenal Cloud Gate 2, completes the double bill. This striking piece harnesses the power of the moon and the mythology and poetry of humankind to thrill the audience.

The prestigious National Kaohsiung Center for the Arts (Weiwuying) is the first national theatre located in southern Taiwan.

Follow #SDConTour @SydneyDanceCo FacebookInstagram and Twitter.

Return to homepage Return to 2018 Season

Taiwan
National Kaohsiung Center for the Arts (Weiwuying)
3 November 7:30pm
4 November 2:30pm
No.1, Sanduo 1st Rd., Fengshan Dist., Kaohsiung City 83075, Taiwan

BOOK NOW

Lux Tenebris
Choreography: Rafael Bonachela
Composer: 
Nick Wales
Lighting Design: Benjamin Cisterne

Full Moon
Choreographer Cheng Tsung-lung
Composer Lim Giong
Lighting Damien Cooper
Costumes Fan Huaichih

Lux Tenebris

★★★★ Utterly mesmerising’ – The Guardian

★★★★★ The dancing is astonishing!’ – ArtsHub

‘★★★★½ A winning combination that, on the one hand provokes and entertains, and on the other confronts and moves its audience in a dazzling evening of dance.’ – Limelight Magazine

Full Moon

In Cheng Tsung-lung’s luminous Full Moon there is a profound sense of eternal motion, and not only because Cheng’s piece has thrilling eruptions of speed and full-bodied swirls. There is vivid life even in moments of what appears to be complete stillness.’ – The Australian

“It’s a splendid feast for eyes and ears with Fan Huai-chih’s gorgeously flowing costumes, Lim Giong’s gleaming commissioned score and Cooper’s magical lighting.” – The Australian

‘World class and deserves a place in permanent repertoire . . . an experience as enjoyable and enigmatic as the full moon.’ – Daily Telegraph