New Creations 2

Choreographed by: Rafael Bonachela and Emanuel Gat

Soledad, Irony of Fate and Satisfying Musical Moments 

New Creations 2 features the Australian premiere of two award-winning works by artistic director and resident choreographer Rafael Bonachela: Irony Of Fate—a solo work created for and danced for the final time by Amy Hollingsworth and Soledad—an intimate and intense duet. These were performed alongside a world premiere by renowned Israeli choreographer Emanuel Gat created especially for Sydney Dance Company, an artist renowned for creating visually alluring and strikingly versatile choreography.

Irony of Fate was created by Rafael Bonachela in 2004 for dancer Amy Hollingsworth and the violinist Ruth Palmer. The work is a dialogue between two artists, wherein virtuosity and passion come together, taking the performers on a journey to the brink of exhaustion.

Commissioned by Probe in 2005 and performed in Europe by the Bonachela Dance Company, Soledad was awarded both the Guglielmo Ebreo Prize and the Critic’s prize at the Biennale Danza e Italia International Competition in 2006.

Satisfying Musical Moments is, in many ways, a journey into the alchemy of form and substance. The work is an invitation to join this remarkable group of individuals, as they dive into intricate choreography and intimate moments. The piece explores the capacity of dance to lead both makers and audiences, towards fresh and surprising insights. The elaborated choreographic mechanism is manifested through dynamic structures, creating an architectural environment for the human drama unfolding on stage. Satisfying Musical Moments, works its way from the intimacy of the single dancer, to overwhelming tableaux of massive compositions. It offers a complex yet simple and honest way of tackling the most relevant questions regarding art-making and life.

 

Sydney Theatre 
12 – 23 October 2010

Irony of Fate
Choreography: Rafael Bonachela
Music: Vytautus Barkauskas Partita
Costume Design: Robert Cary-Williams
Lighting Design: Michael Mannion
Sound Design: Adam Iuston
Dancer: Amy Hollingsworth
Violinist: Ruth Palmer

Soledad
Choreography: Rafael Bonachela
Music: Gidon Kremer – Milona en re; Oblivion – Homage to Piazzola; Chavela Vargas – La Llorona; Noche de Ronda
Sound Design: Adam Iuston
Original Lighting Design: Lee Curran
Cast: Emily Amisano & Richard Cilli or Annabel Knight & Lachlan Bell

Satisfying Musical Moments
Choreography, Music & Lights: Emanuel Gat
Choreographic Assistant: Amy Hollingsworth
Additional Music: Franz Schubert – Des Tages Weihe D 763
Costume Coordination: Claire Rassmussen
Sound Design: Adam Iuston
Cast: Natalie Allen, Emily Amisano, Juliette Barton, Lachlan Bell, Adam Blanch, Richard Cilli, Janessa Dufty, Kynan Hughes, Fiona Jopp, Bernhard Knauer, Annabel Knight, Alana Sargent, Chen Wen, Charmene Yap

New Creations 2 Campaign Photography: Tim Richardson

‘The connection between Hollingsworth, who performs with exquisite precision, and the elegant Palmer is like an invisible umbilical cord that links the stationary musician and writhing dancer.’Daily Telegraph 

‘Gat’s piece is like watching a science experiment where the dancers are atoms that bounce off each other, are attracted, repelled, form bonds or rest on the edges, always watching one another intently.’Daily Telegraph    

‘Spectacular form of the dancers who collectively dazzle.’ Daily Telegraph 

‘Hollingsworth finished each phrase with beautiful finesse, her muscular torso, expressive arms and arrow-sharp feet delineating every bar of the music.’Dance Australia 

‘Soledad… superb dancing and characterisation by both dancers’Dance Australia 

‘a vigorous, strongly danced program’ – Sydney Morning Herald 

‘Emily Amisano and Richard Cilli dance stylishly and sensitively to seductive music in the Latin style. Between them, the dancers flesh out challenging choreography with the human spirit.’Sydney Morning Herald  

‘Hollingsworth’s impressive muscular strength is stretched to its limits in a beautifully paced short piece that may run to only about 10 minutes but is packed with virtuosic athleticism.’ – Sydney Morning Herald